• Religion & Spirituality

    Holiness: For the Will of God Is Your Sanctification – 1 Thessalonians 4:3 [Annotated, Updated]

    A thorough study of sin, salvation by faith, and the Christian’s journey of sanctification. He who wants a correct understanding of holiness must first begin by examining the vast and solemn subject of sin. He must dig down very deep if he wants to build high. Wrong views about holiness are generally traceable to wrong views about human corruption. Practical holiness and entire self-consecration to God are not given adequate attention by modern Christians. The unsaved sometimes rightly complain that Christians are not as kind and unselfish and good-natured as those who make no profession of faith. Far too many Christians make a verbal proclamation of faith, yet remain unchanged in heart and lifestyle. But Scripture makes it clear that holiness, in its place and proportion, is quite as important as justification. Holiness, without which no one shall see the Lord (Hebrews 12:14). It is imperative that Christians are biblically and truly holy. The aim of this book is to instruct you, equip you, and encourage you in the pursuit of holiness. About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900. Read more
    $0.00$17.99
  • Religion & Spirituality

    Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Luke: A Commentary (Updated Edition)

    It seemed fitting for me as well, having investigated everything carefully from the beginning, to write it out for you in consecutive order, most excellent Theophilus; so that you may know the exact truth about the things you have been taught. – Luke 1:3-4 Wisdom, encouragement, and exhortation is contained in these pages. Not because of the author’s brilliance, but because of the words of truth contained in the gospel of Luke. And just as the Apostle Luke didn’t draw any attention to himself, so also J. C. Ryle clearly and wonderfully directs his words and our thoughts towards the inspired words of scripture. If we truly love God, we will love His word; and the more study His word, the more we will love God. About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.
    $0.00$19.99
  • Religion & Spirituality

    Repentance [Annotated, Updated]: What it Means to Repent and Why We Must Do So

    Except you repent, you will all likewise perish. – Luke 13:5 It is indifference that leaves people alone and allows them to go their own way. It is love, tender love, that warns them and raises the cry of alarm. The cry of “Fire! Fire!” at midnight might sometimes rudely, harshly, and unpleasantly startle a person out of his sleep, but who would complain if that cry was the means of saving his life? The words Except you repent, you will all likewise perish might at first seem stern and severe, but they are words of love, and they could be the means of delivering precious souls from hell. 1.The nature of repentance: What is it? 2.The necessity of repentance: Why is repentance needful? 3.The encouragements to repentance: What is there to lead people to repent? About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.
    $0.00$12.99
  • Religion & Spirituality

    Expository Thoughts on the Gospel of Matthew [Updated Edition]: A Commentary

    body { font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.6em; } .aplus { min-width: inherit; } <div><i> Therefore everyone who hears these words of Mine and acts on them, may be compared to a wise man who built his house on the rock.</i> – Matthew 7:24<br /><br /><b>Wisdom, encouragement, and exhortation</b> is contained in these pages. Not because of the author’s brilliance, but because of the words of truth contained in the gospel of Matthew. And just as the apostle Matthew didn’t draw any attention to himself, so also J. C. Ryle clearly and wonderfully directs his words and our thoughts towards the inspired words of scripture. If we truly love God, we will love His word; and the more study His word, the more we will love God.<br /><br /><b>About the Author</b><br />John Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including <i>Expository Thoughts on the Gospels</i>, <i>Principles for Churchmen</i>, and <i>Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century</i>. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900. <br /></div> <em></em> Read more Read less (function(f) {f(window.P._namespace(“bookDescription”));}(function(P) { // Log render timestamp P.execute(‘dp-atf-bookDescription’, function () { if (typeof window.markFeatureRender === ‘function’) { window.markFeatureRender(‘bookDescription’); } }); P.declare(“book-description-config”, { logInteractivity: true }); })); P.when(‘DynamicIframe’).execute(function(DynamicIframe){ var BookDescriptionIframe = null, bookDescEncodedData = “%3Ci%3E%20Therefore%20everyone%20who%20hears%20these%20words%20of%20Mine%20and%20acts%20on%20them%2C%20may%20be%20compared%20to%20a%20wise%20man%20who%20built%20his%20house%20on%20the%20rock.%3C%2Fi%3E%20%26%23×2013%3B%20Matthew%207%3A24%3Cbr%20%2F%3E%3Cbr%20%2F%3E%3Cb%3EWisdom%2C%20encouragement%2C%20and%20exhortation%3C%2Fb%3E%20is%20contained%20in%20these%20pages.%20Not%20because%20of%20the%20author%27s%20brilliance%2C%20but%20because%20of%20the%20words%20of%20truth%20contained%20in%20the%20gospel%20of%20Matthew.%20And%20just%20as%20the%20apostle%20Matthew%20didn%27t%20draw%20any%20attention%20to%20himself%2C%20so%20also%20J.%20C.%20Ryle%20clearly%20and%20wonderfully%20directs%20his%20words%20and%20our%20thoughts%20towards%20the%20inspired%20words%20of%20scripture.%20If%20we%20truly%20love%20God%2C%20we%20will%20love%20His%20word%3B%20and%20the%20more%20study%20His%20word%2C%20the%20more%20we%20will%20love%20God.%3Cbr%20%2F%3E%3Cbr%20%2F%3E%3Cb%3EAbout%20the%20Author%3C%2Fb%3E%3Cbr%20%2F%3EJohn%20Charles%20Ryle%20%281816-1900%29%20graduated%20from%20Eton%20and%20Oxford%20and%20then%20pursued%20a%20career%20in%20politics%2C%20but%20due%20to%20lack%20of%20funds%2C%20he%20entered%20the%20clergy%20of%20the%20Church%20of%20England.%20He%20was%20a%20contemporary%20of%20Spurgeon%2C%20Moody%2C%20Mueller%2C%20and%20Taylor%20and%20read%20the%20great%20theologians%20like%20Wesley%2C%20Bunyan%2C%20Knox%2C%20Calvin%2C%20and%20Luther.%20These%20all%20influenced%20Ryle%26%23×2019%3Bs%20understanding%20and%20theology.%20Ryle%20began%20his%20writing%20career%20with%20a%20tract%20following%20the%20Great%20Yarmouth%20suspension%20bridge%20tragedy%2C%20where%20more%20than%20a%20hundred%20people%20drowned.%20He%20gained%20a%20reputation%20for%20straightforward%20preaching%20and%20evangelism.%20He%20travelled%2C%20preached%2C%20and%20wrote%20more%20than%20300%20pamphlets%2C%20tracts%2C%20and%20books%2C%20including%20%3Ci%3EExpository%20Thoughts%20on%20the%20Gospels%3C%2Fi%3E%2C%20%3Ci%3EPrinciples%20for%20Churchmen%3C%2Fi%3E%2C%20and%20%3Ci%3EChristian%20Leaders%20of%20the%20Eighteenth%20Century%3C%2Fi%3E.%20Ryle%20used%20the%20royalties%20from%20his%20writing%20to%20pay%20his%20father%26%23×2019%3Bs%20debts%2C%20but%20he%20also%20felt%20indebted%20to%20that%20ruin%20for%20changing%20the%20direction%20of%20his%20life.%20He%20was%20recommended%20by%20Prime%20Minister%20Benjamin%20Disraeli%20to%20be%20Bishop%20of%20Liverpool%20where%20he%20ended%20his%20career%20in%201900.%20%3Cbr%20%2F%3E”, bookDescriptionAvailableHeight, minBookDescriptionInitialHeight = 112, options = {}, iframeId = “bookDesc_iframe”; function resizeCallback() { P.guardFatal(“bookDescription”, function() { // Get the line-height of the iframe var iframe = document.getElementById(iframeId); var iframeDocument = iframe.contentDocument; if (true && iframeDocument && iframeDocument.defaultView) { // Set the height to the number of lines specified var numLines = parseInt(5, 10); // Get the line-height of the iframe var iframeContent = iframeDocument.getElementById(“iframeContent”); // Compute the line height var lineHeight = iframeDocument.defaultView.getComputedStyle(iframeContent, null).getPropertyValue(“line-height”); // Parse the line height lineHeight = parseFloat(lineHeight); bookDescriptionAvailableHeight = Math.round(lineHeight * numLines); } else { var bdOffsetTop = document.getElementById(“bookDescription_feature_div”).offsetTop; var imageBlockOffsetTop = document.getElementById(“booksImageBlock_feature_div”).offsetTop; var imageBlockHeight = document.getElementById(“booksImageBlock_feature_div”).offsetHeight; bookDescriptionAvailableHeight = imageBlockOffsetTop + imageBlockHeight -bdOffsetTop – 30; if(bookDescriptionAvailableHeight bookDescriptionAvailableHeight + 30){ if(document.getElementById(“bdSeeLessPrompt”).style.display == “none”){ document.getElementById(“outer_postBodyPS”).style.height = bookDescriptionAvailableHeight + ‘px’; document.getElementById(“psPlaceHolder”).style.display =”block”; document.getElementById(“bdSeeAllPrompt”).style.display =”block”; } else{ document.getElementById(“outer_postBodyPS”).style.height = psTotalHeight + ‘px’; } } else{ document.getElementById(“outer_postBodyPS”).style.height = psTotalHeight + ‘px’; document.getElementById(“psPlaceHolder”).style.display =”none”; document.getElementById(“bdSeeAllPrompt”).style.display =”block”; document.getElementById(“bdSeeLessPrompt”).style.display =”none”; document.getElementById(“bdExpanderIcon”).className = document.getElementById(“bdExpanderIcon”).className.replace(“rotate”,””); } })(); } options.iframeId = iframeId; options.iframeWrapperId = “bookDesc_iframe_wrapper”; options.overriddenCSSId = “bookDesc_override_CSS”; options.encodedIframeContent = bookDescEncodedData; options.initialResizeCallback = resizeCallback; BookDescriptionIframe = new DynamicIframe(options); P.guardFatal(“bookDescription”, function() { BookDescriptionIframe.createIframe(); }) (); if ((typeof BookDescriptionIframe != ‘undefined’) && (BookDescriptionIframe instanceof DynamicIframe)) { P.when(‘jQuery’, ‘book-description-config’).execute(function($, config) { $(window).resize(function() { P.guardFatal(“bookDescription”, function() { BookDescriptionIframe.resizeIframe(resizeCallback); }) (); }); $(window).bind(‘imageResize’, function() { P.guardFatal(“bookDescription”, function() { BookDescriptionIframe.resizeIframe(resizeCallback); }) (); }); // Log interactivity timestamp if (!!config.logInteractivity) { if (typeof window.markFeatureInteractive === ‘function’) { window.markFeatureInteractive(‘bookDescription’); } } }); } });
    $0.00$16.99
  • Religion & Spirituality

    Putting our best book forward

    $0.00$16.99
    Religion & Spirituality

    Putting our best book forward

    “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey Him?” – Mark 4:41 Wisdom, encouragement, and exhortation is contained in these pages. Not because of the author’s brilliance, but because of the words of truth contained in the gospel of Mark. And just as the apostle Mark didn’t draw any attention to himself, so also J. C. Ryle clearly and wonderfully directs his words and our thoughts towards the inspired words of scripture. If we truly love God, we will love His word; and the more study His word, the more we will love God. About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.
    $0.00$16.99
  • Religion & Spirituality

    The Cross [Annotated, Updated]: Crucified with Christ, and Christ Alive in Me

    I am crucified with Christ; nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ lives in me, and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. – Galatians 2:20 I want to tell you what perhaps the greatest Christian who ever lived (the Apostle Paul) thought of the cross of Christ. Believe me, the cross is of deepest importance. This is no mere question of controversy; this is not one of those points on which men may agree to differ and feel that differences will not shut them out of heaven. A man must be right on this subject, or he is lost forever. Heaven or hell, happiness or misery, life or death, blessing or cursing in the last day – all hinges on the answer to this question: “What do you think about the cross of Christ?” Let me show you: What the apostle Paul did not glory in. What Paul did glory in. Why all Christians should think and feel about the cross like Paul. About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.
    $0.00$12.99
  • Religion & Spirituality

    Straightforward Thoughts for Young Men: What Every Young Man Must Consider Now, Before It’s Too Late

    For the flesh lusts against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh; and these are contrary the one to the other – Galatians 5:17 Young men, you form a large and very important class in the population of this country; but where, and in what condition, are your souls? I am growing old myself, but there are few things that I can remember so well as the days of my youth. I have a most distinct recollection of the joys and the sorrows, the hopes and the fears, the temptations and the difficulties, the mistaken judgments and the misplaced affections, and the errors and the aspirations which surround and accompany a young man’s life. If I can only say something to keep some young man walking in the right way and preserve him from faults and sins, which may hurt his prospects both for time and eternity, I shall be very thankful. There are four things which I propose to do: 1.I will mention some general reasons why young men need exhorting.2.I will note some special dangers which young men need to be warned about.3.I will give some general advice which I beg young men to receive.4.I will set down some special rules of conduct which I strongly advise young men to follow. On each of these four points I have something to say, and my young friend, I pray to God that what I say may do good to your soul. – J. C. Ryle Updated edition based on Thoughts for Young Men About the AuthorJohn Charles Ryle (1816-1900) graduated from Eton and Oxford and then pursued a career in politics, but due to lack of funds, he entered the clergy of the Church of England. He was a contemporary of Spurgeon, Moody, Mueller, and Taylor and read the great theologians like Wesley, Bunyan, Knox, Calvin, and Luther. These all influenced Ryle’s understanding and theology. Ryle began his writing career with a tract following the Great Yarmouth suspension bridge tragedy, where more than a hundred people drowned. He gained a reputation for straightforward preaching and evangelism. He travelled, preached, and wrote more than 300 pamphlets, tracts, and books, including Expository Thoughts on the Gospels, Principles for Churchmen, and Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Ryle used the royalties from his writing to pay his father’s debts, but he also felt indebted to that ruin for changing the direction of his life. He was recommended by Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli to be Bishop of Liverpool where he ended his career in 1900.
    $0.00$11.99